Plant Response System | Do Plants Feel Pain | Plant Experiments

Plant Response System to touch and contact is facilitated by the thigmotropism mechanism. Arguably, proper functioning of the thigmotropism mechanisms is aided by various Plant Response System | Do Plants Feel Pain | Plant Experimentscomponents in the mint plant response system to touch and contact. To start with, the mint plant response system has specialized structures. For instance, Markovic et.al (2016) mentions that the Venus fly trap, have tiny hairy structures that are particularly located inside the leaves trap. Besides, the mint plant response system also has glands. According to Markovic et.al (2016), these glands will secrete enzymes. For instance, pulling back to the previous contextual example, the Venus fly trap after an insect touches it, the leaves will close, and the glands secrete enzymes that digest the insects. However, Markovic et.al (2016) notes that the enzymes secreted will not necessarily act similar to the Venus fly trap case.

On the other side, for the mint plant response system to contact, that is thigmomorphogenesis, which will affect the mint plant shape, the system will include components such as xylem. According to Markovic et.al (2016), xylem is a strengthening tissue that is produced  particularly to add stiffness as well as resist any agents such as the wind that may result to the collapsing of the mint plant- for instance, tendrils.

Components of the Mint plant Response System on Defense

Pulling back to the fore mentioned, mint plants have a defense response system to two notable enemies – pathogens and herbivorous. The mechanism responsible for this response is aided by various components within the mint plant defense response system. To start with, the mint plant defense response systems includes enzymes and toxins. War et.al (2012) argues that there enzymes and toxins are secreted by the mint plants for defense mechanisms in case the first line of defense is distorted.

Besides, the mint plant defense response system also comprises of metabolites. According to Taylor et.al (2014), a solid example of secondary metabolites includes alkaloids- they produce noxious odors.  What is more, this response system also has long-distance signaling elicits for instance jasmonates (War et.al, 2012).

Concept Map

Explanation

Notably, the above concept map seeks to shed light in a more practical platform, the linkages of the four crucial Mint plant response systems. The four response systems include response systems to light, contact, gravity as well as defense. It is worth noting that, for defense, the response systems targets two aspects- herbivorous and pathogens. In line with the fore mentioned, this section seeks to explain the above concept map through analyzing the linkages.

To start with, the concept map illustrates that, the mint plant is the source of the linkage between all the response systems.  Arguably, all the response systems, that is, from the response system of light to the response system of defenses arise from the plant. As such, the plant is the source of the above-illustrated response systems.

In addition, the above response systems seek to aid in the growth of the mint plant. Lux & Rost (2012) educates that, response systems helps and facilitates the growth of plants. Similarly, as illustrated by the above concept map, the responses systems will converge to the mint plant, which will aid in the growth of the mint plant.

Plant Response System | Do Plants Feel Pain | Plant Experiments

Besides, the above concept map illustrates that the response systems will facilitate two major aspects in a mint plant growth. To start with, the responses system facilitates various plants process. For instance, in accordance with the concept map, the mint response system to light will acquire light which is crucial for photosynthesis (Hohm et.al, 2013). Arguably, Hohm et.al (2013) notes that it is through photosynthesis that the mint plant acquires food which is crucial for its growth. Besides, on the response systems to gravity, it helps the root grow downwards to soil, which in turn helps the plant acquire nutrients.  According to Lux & Rost (2012), the mint plant requires nutrients for its growth. Besides, roots will also help the plant acquire water.

What more is, proper functioning of the response systems is aided by various aspects.  A major aspect that aides the proper functioning of the response systems is the mechanisms. Arguably, every response system has a mechanism, which is unique. For instance, the response system to light is aided by the phototropism mechanism while as the mint plant response system to gravity is aided by geotropism. Besides, each mechanism is also aided by various aspects such as mechanism. For instance, thigmotropism, which is a mechanism in relation to mint plant response system to contact is aided by secretion of xylem tissues (Chehab et.al, 2010). Another notable example is the mint defense response system to defense by pathogens which is aided by jasmonates and enzymes (War et.al, 2012).

The mint plant has four main response systems. These response systems respond to four main stimuli which include light, gravity, contact as well as the defense against both pathogens and herbivores. Notably, for each response system, the mint plant will use a significant mechanism .the above concept map illustrates, the mechanisms that the mint plant embraces in the response system to the four mentioned stimuli. Besides, the concept map also sheds light on the various aspects of each mechanism and what the mechanism seeks to respond to. To sum up, the above contextual concept map has helped illustrate the mint plant response systems to the four main stimuli- contact, light, gravity and defense to both herbivorous and pathogens.

References

  • Chehab, E. W., Eich, E., & Braam, J. (2010). Thigmomorphogenesis: a complex plant response       to mechano-stimulation. Journal of experimental botany, 60(1), 43-56.
  • Lux, A., & Rost, T. L. (2012). Plant root research: the past, present, and also the future. Annals of Botany, 110(2), 201-204.
  • Hohm, T., Preuten, T., & Fankhauser, C. (2013). Phototropism: translating light into directional growth. American Journal of Botany, 100(1), 47-59.
  • War, A. R., Paulraj, M. G., Ahmad, T., Buhroo, A. A., Hussain, B., Ignacimuthu, S., & Sharma, H. C. (2012). Mechanisms of mint plant defense against insect herbivores. Mint Plant signaling & behavior, 7(10), 1306-1320.
  • Taylor, J.  Hatcher, P.& Paul, N. D. (2014). Crosstalk between mint plant responses to pathogens                and herbivores: a view from the outside in. Journal of experimental botany, 55(395), 159- 168.
  • War, A. R., Paulraj, M. G., Ahmad, T., Buhroo, A. A., Hussain, B., Ignacimuthu, S., & Sharma,        H. C. (2012). Mechanisms of mint plant defense against insect herbivores. Mint plant               signaling & behavior, 7(10), 1306-1320.
  • Hohm, T., Preuten, T., & Fankhauser, C. (2013). Phototropism: translating light into directional growth. American journal of Botany, 100(1), 47-59.
  • Markovic, D., Nikolic, N., Seisenbaeva, G., & Ninkovic, V. (2016). Mint plant Responses to             Brief Touching: A Mechanism for Early Neighbour Detection?. PloS one, 11(11),     e0165742.
  • Sato, E. M., Hijazi, H, Vissenberg, K., & Swarup, R. (2014). New insights into root gravitropic         signaling. Journal of experimental botany, eru515.
  • Braam, J. (2015). In touch: mint plant responses to mechanical stimuli. New Phytologist, 165(2),                 373-389.