Sociological Imagination
Author:
Genre: General Awareness
Publication Year: 2013

A sociologist thinks differently than the world and thus the predictions of the sociologist are more prone to imagination which is called as the sociological imagination. The article discusses how and where sociological imagination is used and its impact.

About the Book

INTRODUCTION

Sociological imagination is the way sociology interpret things. The sociologist’s perspective can be different from what the popular perspective is. The American sociologist C Wright Mills coined the term and defined what exactly is the phenomenon. It is really important to have an imaginative thought to have a better and wider perspective of the world. A sociologist thinks differently than the world and thus the predictions of the sociologist are more prone to imagination which is called as the sociological imagination. The main idea was written by Mills in the book named Sociological Imagination which mainly deals with the understanding of the individual and society which are the two main abstracts of the social reality.

The main theme of the concept was giving importance to the thinking process, being able to think independently and beyond the restricted thinking is called the sociological imagination. The experience and the wider society are related to the imagination and that is the link which can be explored in the sociological imagination. It has importance in gauging and analyzing capabilities of the individuals and the reactions of how they behave towards the society. The individual and the society are the two key points of the theory. The ability to think freely and keeping oneself away from eth situation also comprises sociological imagination. The thinking should be free from the biasing, restriction and even the contexts and changes.

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