AIB Style Guide Line | Information Prominent | Projects Assignment Help

REFERENCING
This section explains in detail the referencing requirements for AIB assignments, projects and theses. Firstly, a brief summary outlines the generic requirements; then, referencing details are presented to ensure you appropriately reference all written academic work submitted to AIB.

1.1    Summary of referencing requirements

Refer to the following list for a summary of AIB referencing requirements:

AIB assignments, projects and theses must contain proper referencing using the Harvard style. Your grade will be adversely affected if your assignment or project contains no/poor citations and/or reference list.
AIB assignments/projects normally contain the following number of relevant references from different sources in the reference list:
o

BBA assignments

5–10

o

MBA assignments

6–12

o   Projects (BBA & MBA)

20–25

The number of references needed for a Research Degree Thesis will vary depending on the length of the Thesis. Your Principal Supervisor will advise you if you have too many or too few references.

About the Book

AIB Style Guide Line | Information Prominent | Projects Assignment Help

This document is divided into three sections. AIB Style Guide Line

AIB Style Guide Line provides you with an in-depth analysis of referencing and how to ensure you reference appropriately for your AIB assignments.

AIB Style Guide Line | Information Prominent | Projects Assignment HelpSection 2 explains how to present your assignment in report format which is the standard format for AIB assignments.

Section 3 outlines how to style and present any documents you are submitting during your AIB study.

  1. REFERENCING

This section explains in detail the referencing requirements for AIB assignments, projects and theses. Firstly, a brief summary outlines the generic requirements; then, referencing details are presented to ensure you appropriately reference all written academic work submitted to AIB.

1.1    Summary of referencing requirements

Refer to the following list for a summary of AIB referencing requirements:

  • AIB assignments, projects and theses must contain proper referencing using the Harvard style. Your grade will be adversely affected if your assignment or project contains no/poor citations and/or reference list.
  • AIB assignments/projects normally contain the following number of relevant references from different sources in the reference list:
oBBA assignments5–10
oMBA assignments6–12
o   Projects (BBA & MBA)20–25

The number of references needed for a Research Degree Thesis will vary depending on the length of the Thesis. Your Principal Supervisor will advise you if you have too many or too few references.

  • All references must be from credible sources such as books, industry related journals, magazines, company documents and recent academic articles.
  • AIB has chosen to use the Harvard style (author–date) referencing system. According to this system, assignments/projects need to include both of the following:

o In-text citations (or in-text references) of quoted and paraphrased materials to support your arguments/comments. These are brief citations included in the text.

o A reference list at the end of the assignment/project relating specifically to your in-text citations. This reference list is presented in alphabetical order by author surname and presents full details of each publication cited in the text.

1.2    In-text citation (or in-text referencing)

AIB Style Guide Line | Information Prominent | Projects Assignment Help

There are two main methods of in-text citations/references:

  1. Author Prominent is when you name the author at the commencement of the sentence i.e. Hardy (2010) states that AIB has a number of goals for the research department in the 2012–2015 Research Plan.
  1. Information Prominent is when there is no direct reference to the author’s name within the statement i.e. AIB has a number of goals for the research department in the 2012–2015 Research Plan (Hardy 2010).

Each of these two methods is useful and appropriate. However, we advise you to focus on Information Prominent in-text citation as it demonstrates good practice. It allows you to clearly state your argument and then use the in-text reference as support.

Authoring Bodies with Long Names

If an authoring body has a long name, it may be abbreviated for citations but needs to be spelt out in full in the reference list.

Two/Three Authors/Authoring Bodies

If there are two or three authors of the work being cited, all the surnames are listed followed by the year i.e. (Hardy, Abraham & Markus 2010). If the citation is Author Prominent, use ‘and’ rather than an ampersand.

Four or More Authors/Authoring Bodies

If there are four or more authors of the work being cited, the citation will list the surname of the first author, followed by ‘et al.’ i.e. (Hardy et al. 2010).

Two or More Works Cited at One Time

If you are citing two or more works at the same point in the text, these are separated by a semicolon i.e. (Hardy 2010; Markus 2011).

More than One Work by the Same Author/Authoring Body

When you are referring to more than one work by the same author, you need to separate the years of publication with a comma i.e. (Hardy 2010, 2011). If a page reference is used it will be: (Hardy 2010, p. 5; 2011, p. 8). If the works were published in the same year, differentiate between them with ‘a’, ‘b’ etc. as follows: (Hardy 2010a, 2010b).

Authors with the Same Family Name

Where authors share the same family name, differentiate between them by including their initials in the citation.

An Edited, Compiled, Revised or Translated Work

These are noted with the abbreviations ‘ed.’, ‘comp.’, ‘rev.’ and ‘trans.’ as in the following example: (ed. Hardy 2009). In a reference list, this will appear in brackets after the name and before the year. If the author is still of primary importance, the editor/translator etc. can be acknowledged in the references, listed after the title of the work.

Different Editions

If the work is not a first edition the citation remains the same, but the edition will be noted in the references, placed after the title of the publication.

Unknown Dates

If the date of publication is unknown, the term ‘n.d.’ (no date) is used in place of the year. If a date is established but not certain, ‘c.’ (circa) may be used before the year.

No Author/Authoring Body

If no author name is available for the work it is both cited and referenced by the title.

Use of Short Title

If a work is better known by a short title, this may be used in citation, but the full title must be recorded in the references.

Contributions within Publications

To cite a preface, foreword etc., provide both author names e.g. (Markus, in Hardy 2010).

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